Young Carbondale Republican eyes Scott Tipton's seat

By Pat Sunderland


Young Carbondale Republican eyes Scott Tipton's seat | election, Republicans,

Alex Beinstein

Alex Beinstein doesn't have the financial resources of U.S. Rep. Scott Tipton, so he's counting on face-to-face contact with Republicans, media and citizens in the 3rd Congressional District. It's his hope to garner enough delegate votes to force a primary race in his effort to unseat Tipton.

"I run to truly annihilate Islamic terror and to reclaim our constitutional heritage," Beinstein said during a visit to Delta last week.

"I don't think we can defeat radical Islam without radically reshaping our relationship with Saudi Arabia, the world's number one state sponsor of terror. And I don't think it made much sense to fight the Revolutionary War only to replace one monstrous central authority in London with another in Washington, D.C. And yet career politicians like Scott Tipton act as if Congress should be a new British monarchy, voting, for example, on the Every Student Succeeds Act despite there being nothing in the Constitution granting Congress the power to regulate education.

Beinstein is just 27 years old, but developed a passion for politics at an even younger age of 15. He attended high school in Carbondale, where he protested the use of class time by a Baptist sports program. He brought the issue before the school superintendent, who changed school policy to prohibit the use of school/class time to promote specific religious denominations.

In college, he hosted a radio program called "Tomorrow with Alex Beinstein," where he discussed a range of topics with politicians and reporters.

He studied American history, learning all he could about the U.S. Constitution. He attended law school in Maine, where again he really "zeroed in" on the Constitution.

He had every intention of sitting for the bar, but as he studied Tipton's voting record, the more it bothered him. He decided to try to "shake things up to make America a better place to live in."

The first hurdle is garnering 30 percent of the delegate votes at the state Republican convention, to earn a spot on the June 28 primary.

"If I put in the work, it's certainly doable," he said.

He feels he's gotten a warm reception across the 3rd Congressional District. "People like the fact that I'm young and don't know the ways of Washington," he said.

He may not know the "ways" of Washington, but he can talk policy like a veteran politician. "There are a lot of issues where I feel I could get broad, bipartisan support," he said. He specifically mentions states' rights, as opposed to the feds' "one-size-fits-all" mandates.

If his quest is unsuccessful, Beinstein says he'll either pursue a doctorate in history or practice law in the Roaring Fork Valley.

More about the candidate can be found at alexfor3rdcd.wordpress.com.